About me

Hello stranger!

My name is Sergei Sergejev (Estonian passport name), or Sergey Sergeev in English, or Сергей Сергеев in Russian.

You can learn a bit about me from this interview from 2013.

This blog was launched in 2006 as a place to share setup of linux on my laptop. Back then it was hell of experience – not everything worked and you needed to fix stuff with google and a hammer. Now it just works, but I’m working on my Mac, keeping old Ubuntu ThinkPad at home.

I wanted to become a doctor. Instead I became a software doctor… sort of. I saw how bad software causes problems and giving it’s eating the world – we have an epidemic! Helping create useful software that is not a pain in the ass for the user – is my aspiration. So far it seems I end up at wrong side of history.

I studied IT Systems Development at Estonian IT College. I felt that development is not my thing and even wanted to quit as I’ve put way too much attention and mental resources to details. Though, I really liked scripting (Bash, Python), creating documentation (wikis, reports), making analysis (UX, critical thinking, diagrams) and verification. This way, I became a software tester.

I did manual testing finding tricky errors thanks to gray box approach and rich imagination. I moved on to test automation only to find out that it’s often a mental masturbation ( term I first heard from Jim Coplien) not assuring much and being in a way of fast delivery. I owe a blog post about that…

Being a sucker at software development, a critical thinker continuously distracted by seeing how software development process and people interactions affect quality more than engineering practices, I became interested in software development methodologies (Scrum, Kanban, Lean, Theory of Constraints) and so called management 2.0.

Jerry Weinberg says:

No matter how it looks at first, it’s always a people problem

Pieter Hintjens (R.I.P.) summed up this nicely:

It took me decades to realize that technology is a slave to personality. It doesn’t matter how good the design, when there are unresolved problems in the organization.

And so gradually I shifted from technical architect to social architect. From caring about technical designs to caring about people and the psychology that drives them. Because in the end, this is what seems to make the difference between a working project and a failure.

I’m also interested in topics about personal productivity – I’m following an empty inbox rule (and it works), try to follow Jedi Technique and try to use my paper notepad as much as possible.

All written in this blog is my personal opinion unless mentioned otherwise.

You can find me on:


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